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Do It Yourself - Most Popular

How to Remove Linoleum Print E-mail
Written by Tom   

Removing linoleum could be a very difficult task if the components under the linoleum and the type of floor where it was installed are not identified. Understanding these components is the key to how to remove linoleum effectively.

What You Will Need:

  • Scraper
  • Sander
  • Cutter or Utility Knife
  • Heat Gun
  • Saws

Buy Now

Underneath the linoleum is an adhesive or glue that might have bonded on the floor after so many years. Removing the linoleum is a little bit easy but removing the adhesive is a lot challenging. Certain techniques have to be tried before the right solution for the problem is applied.

Knowing the type of floor helps in determining the ease of removing old linoleum. If the linoleum is placed under a concrete floor, the steps on how to remove linoleum adhesive are very easy. On the other hand, if the linoleum and adhesive are placed on the hardwood or plywood sub floor then the procedures on how to remove linoleum glue could be difficult.

Steps To Remove Linoleum

1. Outline a small portion of the linoleum with a knife or cutter. This will be your guide on how much linoleum you will be removing. Linoleum should be removed in small portions for ease of execution and the type of floor could be easily determined.

2. Apply hot water on the outlined area. Wait for a few minutes. If you are working with a hardwood skip to step 3.

3. Carefully peel the linoleum with the heat gun. Heat gun could be used instead of hot water to easily separate the adhesive from the floor.

NOTE:

The wooden sub-floor generally will not require removal of the linoleum first. The sub-floor could be completely removed with the linoleum. If you’re just starting to learn how to remove linoleum flooring on a sub-floor, better do it really slowly.

Removing the adhesives in concrete and hardwood is really easy but will require a lot of patience. If you are able to understand how to remove linoleum tile on a concrete floor, solvents could be applied to melt the adhesives. This practice cannot completely remove the adhesives so a heat gun should be used to remove smaller portions of adhesive on the floor. Applying solvent on a hardwood on the other hand, is not recommended. Heat guns could be used to melt the adhesives.

On the other hand, if the linoleum is installed on a wooden sub-floor, the linoleum and the wooden sub-floor could be removed at the same time. The challenge of how to remove linoleum floor in this type of installation is to determine the depth of the sub-floor. If the depth of the sub-floor is overestimated, the actual hardwood could be affected. The depth could be determined by slowly drilling a hole in the sub-floor and match the depth of that measurement to the circular saw. The circular saw should cut in smaller pieces to easily remove the sub-floor together with the linoleum.

Comments (88)
  • Jeff  - I just put tile over my linoleum
    I have to say I had a hard time trying to remove my linoleum, It was such a pain so I just put tile on top.
  • gman  - i did too!
    hah! That is what I did too!
  • Marla  - Tiling over linoleum
    How did it turn out? I have a 7yr old home and the linoleum is also that old. It is on concrete and I don't really want to remove the tile if I don't have to. Any bad points to tiling over it?
  • steven
    I do this for a living and tiling over isnt a bad idea. It all depends on the condition of the glue.if smooth and solid tiling over wont hurt it, if its cracking and partly chipped/ing up you want to remove it.
  • Josh  - ??
    Hey mate I'm removing Lino from a hard wood floor the Lino was to damaged to tile over I was wondering what you would suggest to be the quickest method of removing the Lino... The top bit is easy with a BBQ scraper but the stuff underneath is the problem.. Any ideas or tips ??
  • trail
    How bad is to bad to tile over
  • bevtrigilio@yahoo.com  - tile over linoleum
    actually that is one way to eliminate the cracking that tiles under go as concrete slabs dry out in summer and gain moisture in winter. I live in an area where the membrane is not enough as the clay moves causing a real hardship on the slab If the tile is not heavy enough it will crack and splinter.
  • Jeremy  - Remove linoleum with hot iron
    the hot iron and steam will loosen the glue and you can remove the tiles easily in one full sheet instead of chipping at it with lots of elbow grease.
  • Jared.
    DIY to FYI Its A Pain In The Ass :evil:
  • tile over linoleum
    I'm attempting this weekend in my Master Bath. I have 2 layers on linoleum on top of the sub-floor and need to get both up so I can lay tile. Wich me luck.
  • Jen  - We have 2 layers also
    We are trying to bust through two layers of crappy linoleum...one original from 1974 that was glued all too well unfortunately and the other from the 80s. Sh*t does NOT want to come up. I'm buying a heat gun TODAY.
  • Charlene
    We just chipped it all up with a sharpened flat shovel, and now have a mess of black adhesive to remove before we can lay tile. (cement slab)I guess we will try detergent/water in one area tonight and see how it goes tomorrow. Is there an adhesive remover that works? If I ever decide to do this again, just shoot me...
  • Carol Doty
    I removed old asphalt tile and black glue on myrtlewood floors. Once I had the tile off and much glue scraped, I was told about an acid that could be painted on the hardwood that would remove the stain. Sorry I don't remember the name of the acid.
  • John
    Acid won't work - but white/mineral spirit (turpentine substitute) should - please see my comment nearby.
  • Anonymous
    aa gallon of acetone removes glue. makes it easier to scape
  • John  - Removing tarry adhesive
    If the adhesive under the lino is black, it may be tar-based - in which case you should find that white spirit (US: mineral spirit), sometimes known as turpentine substitute, will remove it. It's not dangerous, but you need to avoid naked flames as once it's lit it's very difficult to put out. It will also defat your skin - so maybe wear gloves if you're doing a lot of work.
  • Newf
    right now i'm in the middle of pulling up a 40 year old lino from concrete. I used a crow bar under a loose edge a slowly worked my way around prying from the bottom. i got all the lino from the floor of a 20 x 10 room in a couple of hours. now i'm just left with small bits of glue everywhere.you will see the lino stretch, but best if you can keep it from cracking as you pry. hope this helps :0
  • Charlene  - finished it
    It turned out that they could lay the tile over the old adhesive, since it was not very thick or uneven. Whew... what a relief! The new tile looks awesome. Wish you luck with yours as well.
  • JULIE  - TILE OVER LINOLEUM
    I would like to know if putting tile over the linoleum cause problems down the road. Did the tile crack?
  • jully  - remove linoleum
    Hi,
    Good query to put up. I suggest that depending on the age of the linoleum and the type of adhesive used it could be extremely difficult to remove. Sometimes linoleum was installed and only glued around the edges and around heat ducts in the floor. If this is the case with your floor, it won't be easier but will at least be less time consuming. On substrate flooring cut the linoleum into strips with a razor knife. This will make it easier to start scraping if your floor is completely glued and will make your old linoleum easier to handle if it is edge glued. Once you have cut the strips now it is time to start scraping and remove linoleum.
  • Joe  - linoleum
    So I can just put tile over the old linoleum? Would I need to put down backerboard? or ?
  • Anonymous
    nope. if it's glued good that is your backerboard. :D
  • Mike Coons  - Best way to remove Linoleum Adhesive
    I needed to remove about 150 sq ft of linoleum last weekend. I tried the heat gun method and the floor steamer method and it took me about an hour and a half to remove about 15 sq ft. Use the following method and your life will be easier. Pull up the top layer of linoleum the best you can. This will leave just the paper backing and adhesive. Go to your local hardware store and buy a gallon of Klean Strip Adhesive Remover. I rolled it on with a cheap paint roller. Do not use a plastic paint pan because it will eat the paint pan. I poured it right on the floor and spread it around after it ate my paint pan. Wait about 15 minutes and use a long handled scraper and the paper and adhesive peels away with little effort. This left no damage at all to my particle board subfloor. If you are using a putty knife to peel it back make sure you are wearing gloves because the stripper will burn your skin. I took about an hour and a half to strip off about 135 Sq ft of adhesive. Do a sma...
  • Michele Lusk  - floor stripper
    My question is the stripper really quick because we have 4 cats and 2 dogs that would have to be kept out of area? Does it leave a residue that would be harmful to pets? Thanks
  • Anonymous
    Will try this. Thanks.
  • Josh Jensen  - Best removal method
    I found if you soak the adhesive with soapy water(degreaser and water) scar it everywhere with a blade and let it soAk for about ten minutes then come back and scrape it with a razorblade scraper it comes right up with little to no elbow grease!!!! Hope this helps you like it did me!!!
  • Sara/Robert 1st timers  - Trying to do without harsh chemicals
    My husband and I just bought our first home (a foreclosure)and getting the many layers of linoleum up has been a challenge especially since I have just entered the 2nd tri-mester of my pregnancy and we are trying to avoid harsh chemicals.This flooring has been there for many years, and it is on hardwood upstairs(under carpet! I don't know why!?) and on a sub-floor in the kitchen.Does anyone have any advice? :x Thanks
  • Marty  - Removing Linoleum
    Be careful if you are pregnant you should NOT be removing anything. Some linoleum was put down with materials including asbestos. Your days for remodeling should be over for now. Depending on the age of your home will determine if you have potential asbestos problems.
  • Fawn
    I am in the same situation, but our house is not so old, so no asbestos. We bought a bucket of dry lye from the local soap co. You do have to worry about skin contact, as it is caustic, but it is non-toxic and makes no fumes. Neutralize with plain vinegar. Works like a charm, glue removal is a cinch!
  • Jessica  - Linoleum
    My master bathroom toilet decided to fill almost 50% of our house with water over Christmas Eve, so we are in the process of finishing getting the adhesive off where the linoleum was laying. It was easy pulling off the 2 layers of linoleum (the people living in this house before us, 2 was their fav number wall paper and all!), seeings how it was soaked completely w/the toilet water. I am in my 2nd almost 3rd trimester as well and have been using hot water w/some detergent. So far so good, but taking longer than expected. Any ideas on removing it quicker w/o harsh chemicals?
  • steve  - steve - Linoleum on concrete
    my 187' kitchen has a 37 year old linoleum floor laid over concrete. I was able to pull up all the linoleum and now I am left with the paper back of the Linoleum and the adhesive has bonded to 90% of the floor to the concrete. I have tried hot water and detergent and a scraper with almost no result. And my wife is pregnant so I can't use strong odor. Is there anyone that can help me with this problem in lifting the adhesive and the paper back of the floor?
  • samfloor
    Two warnings. Solvents can prevent the next flooring from adhering, that is why pros don't use it. And flooring/adhesives made before 1978 and sold before 1995 can contain asbestos.

    Flooring installer for 40 years.
  • Kasey  - Asbestos??? Now you tell me
    I bought a 12' x 24' piece of Fiberfloor on impulse from a store that was going out of business so I could replace the outdoor carpet the previous owners installed in my kitchen/dining room. But when I pulled up the carpet, I found linoleum in the kitchen area which I've spent the last 8 hours loosening with a 3" scraper. (I'm keeping it intact so I can use it as a template for the new floor.) Anyway . . . the house was built in the early 70's. Is there a way to tell if I'm dealing with asbestos?
  • Anonymous  - re: Best way to remove Linoleum Adhesive
    Mike Coons wrote:
    I needed to remove about 150 sq ft of linoleum last weekend. I tried the heat gun method and the floor steamer method and it took me about an hour and a half to remove about 15 sq ft. Use the following method and your life will be easier. Pull up the top layer of linoleum the best you can. This will leave just the paper backing and adhesive. Go to your local hardware store and buy a gallon of Klean Strip Adhesive Remover. I rolled it on with a cheap paint roller. Do not use a plastic paint pan because it will eat the paint pan. I poured it right on the floor and spread it around after it ate my paint pan. Wait about 15 minutes and use a long handled scraper and the paper and adhesive peels away with little effort. This left no damage at all to my particle board subfloor. If you are using a putty knife to peel it back make sure you are wearing gloves because the stripper will burn your skin. I took about an hour and a half to strip off about 135 Sq ft of ad...
  • bailey
    guys thx ima try it :love: :pirate: :?: :( :0 ;)) ;) :) :sleep: :D :angry: :angry-red: :evil: :idea: :x :no-comments: :ooo:
  • Brigitte  - Thank You
    I'm in the process of renovating my house, which includes removing linoleum and I must say that all your tips are very helpful. I've been scrapping my floor for the past 2 days and haven't made much progress. I will be heading to my hardware store to pick up Klean Strip Adhesive and hope it works. :idea:
  • Cheryl  - Help me pleeze


    I am about halfway to getting our basement suite floors stripped down to concrete. So far in the living area I have removed two layers of carpet that was glued to linoleum tile. That was actually not as hard as the kitchen area, ehich is only at best one third done. I stripped of the linoleum down to the paper backing, which I believe is glued to tiles which are in turn glued to the concrete. As far as I can tell, that's it for the layers. I gave tried hot water and a scraper and most of it is still there. At this moment I would love to set it on fire and see if I can do a controlled burn. I will control myself and hope you have any thoughts
  • Christine  - Cheryl, I hope U found the help you sought!
    OMG- I feel so bad for U yet I'm lmao! U have a great sense of humor. I'm reminded of the first home I bought and the hours I spent with heat guns and strippers and sanders in hand. I hope everything turned out beautifully for you! :)
  • Jacque  - what cleans up the Klean Stripr?
    This has been extremely informative. What do you use to get the Klean Strip residue off the concrete? I,too, peeled up 2 layers of linoleum sheet. It took me three days after work to muscle up the Kitchen and laundry room flooring without using a heat gun. I have a layer of paper backing to get up now.
    I plan to paint my concrete floor. I had great results with that in a former home. It looked like terra cotta flagstone. I painted my 1992 countertop to look like granite so I need to paint a floor that won't clash with thatz6XBL.
  • Christine  - did U figure out how to clean up the Klean Strip?
    I'm planning on pulling up the vinyl tiles in the kitchen and 3 bathrooms and staining or painting the concrete.

    Your faux terra cotta countertop sounds nice. What paint did U use? And how did the floor turn out? Did U find a way to clean up the KS residue?

    Wish Home Depot were open right now, but it's 1a.m. I'm inspired by everyone's projects. Best.
  • Kim  - 80 yr old wood floor
    I have beautiful 80 year old wood floors that my mother-in-law glued linoleum down on more than 40 years ago and I am now trying to get up. She has been very proud that they have never moved or curled up...lots of adhesive! How do I get this stuff up. She's too old to remember what she used but it was some good stuff. I don't want to damage to wood. Thank you.
  • Hammad  - Thought
    I just wanted to add my two cents. I had old sheet linoleum in my baths and kitchen. I just laid Duralock board over the linoleum, used a good water/mold resistent caulking at the walls, and used tape and a good water/mold resistent joint compound at the joints. Then you lay your tile on the board. You have a nice clean, even, mold/water resistent surface to lay your tile.
  • Anonymous  - re: linoleum
    Joe wrote:
    So I can just put tile over the old linoleum? Would I need to put down backerboard? or ?
  • Jon  - ahhh
    just sell your house... it will be easier
  • Christine  - Why do my feet always feel wet when I exit my bath
    cool discussion. I bought a repo & noticed that a bathroom smelled a bit like urine, and I can't get rid of the smell. Cleaned everything like crazy. Don't see any leaks around toilet (vinyl tiles over concrete). Could a broken seal cause a leak to occur under the vinyl tiles? Now the floor always feels slightly moist, so something's getting worse. I'm thinking the best place to start is at the bottom, ie, the floor. Thinking of just leaving it concrete.

    Thanks for all your shared experiences and input. We are not alone in our various struggles!
  • Diane  - Christine..urine smell
    I have many cats and found that rubbing alcohol full strength helps alot. Just be careful of what you're putting it on so it doesn't remove the finish. Also a product by Paramount Chemical called "Kids 'N' Pets" It's made in the USA ! Walmart has it.
  • Chris  - Removing 4 layers of linoleum from wood floor
    I have about 4 layers of thick linoleum that has been on my house for about 50 years with some heavy adhesive on a wood floor that looks like tar. I am not trying to save the wood, but need to remove the lino to make the floors level and lay down new flooring. I tried using a scraper and the back of a hammer to pry it up. I only got so far before I had to give up. Is there any machine that I can rent to help? Would a floor stripper machine work or damage the floor? The lino is too think to cut through by hand.
  • Anonymous
    vinigar on the tar flooring works pretty good. Let it soak for an hour then scrape.
  • Karianne  - only glue let
    My husband and I just finished removing the linoleum and the paper backing, but now we still have a lot of glue on the wood sub floor. We tried a cleaner but it did not do much. Any suggestions on how to get the rest of the glue off the wood sub floor?
  • Vanessa  - painting over glue on concrete floor?????
    We just took our carpet off of the basement floor to find out they had old linoleum tiles which came right off, but the floor has this black stuff all over the floor which is very smooth but I think it is the glue(you would think the floor is black. It sort of feels like rubber and the floor underneath is concrete. So we tried painting over it with an oilbased primer (Kilz)but I don't think it is sticking. what can I use to paint over it that will stick?????? :( :( :( :( :( :(
  • Anonymous  - re: Best way to remove Linoleum Adhesive
    Mike Coons wrote:
    I needed to remove about 150 sq ft of linoleum last weekend. I tried the heat gun method and the floor steamer method and it took me about an hour and a half to remove about 15 sq ft. Use the following method and your life will be easier. Pull up the top layer of linoleum the best you can. This will leave just the paper backing and adhesive. Go to your local hardware store and buy a gallon of Klean Strip Adhesive Remover. I rolled it on with a cheap paint roller. Do not use a plastic paint pan because it will eat the paint pan. I poured it right on the floor and spread it around after it ate my paint pan. Wait about 15 minutes and use a long handled scraper and the paper and adhesive peels away with little effort. This left no damage at all to my particle board subfloor. If you are using a putty knife to peel it back make sure you are wearing gloves because the stripper will burn your skin. I took about an hour and a half to strip off about 135 Sq ft of ad...
  • Mary Beth
    Bob(the cheap builder) must have lived in this house.. All of my kitchen cabinets are lined in all this stuff. I just want it out. I scraped it, the paper backing was left, then I got to this old yellow glue. I gave up and put that grid liner over it. Now I want to repaint the cabinets inside and out. Any helpful tips would be great!!! Thank you
  • michelle nolan  - linoleum
    I have peeled off the linoleum and am too left with the paper backing. Cant you just tileover it without problems?
  • Denise
    My home was built early 50's and has wooden floors throughout, however over the years previous owners have seen fit to lay lino in the wet areas, kitchen, bathroom, laundry and glue it to the wooden floor, and then glue kitchen carpet to the lino, how am i going to remove it all so I can tile these areas? any ideas
  • Vince  - Hot Water
    I'm in the process of removing asbestos containing VCT installed in the 1950s from my entire upstairs (about 1000 SF).

    The tiles pop up without breaking using a rigid putty knife.

    Underneath is a thick layer of paper/adhesive.

    I put a large pot of water on the stove and heat to boiling.

    Pour hot water on floor and spread around with a 3M heavy duty floor pad, with holder attached to a broom stick. (Google 3M doodlebug)

    Let water soak in for some time and begin scrubbing it with the 3M pad with the grain of the wood.

    Clean up mess with wet/dry vac.

    More hot water, more scrubbing, more wet/dry vac.

    Wash, rinse, repeat. Keep window open with a fan on to allow wood floor to dry out.

    Not intense work, but it is time consuming.

    Not all adhesives will be water based.

  • sandra mock  - Ugh!
    My husband and I bought our home in 2009, and been attempting to remove this HORRENDOUSLY UGLY lime-green, TEXURED linoleum from our kitchen and laundry room floors that have been here since 1978 (you can tell-they matched the wallpaper and wallplug covers to the floor).This stuff is completely stuck down! We've tried hot water, a sawzall with a flat blade, air hammers attached to our air compressor, the so-called "glue remover", an industrial-grade sander we rented, and all we have is a mess of layers of linoleum paper, patches of glue, frustration, and a complete mess in our kitchen. We're done playing- so we're tiling over it.
  • Dee
    I just found a way to remove old linoleum down to the bare wooden floor. All you need is a bucket of water, a small towel, an iron, and a floor scraper. We used one with a razor blade in the end. Score the linoleum in 4-5" strips. Wet and wring out the towel. Lay it over the portion you want to pry up, put the hot iron on the towel, wait a few seconds, then use the scraper to pry up the entire linoleum section. If only the top portion of the linoleum comes up, steam it again with the wet towel and iron. It is a tedious process, but it does work MUCH better than anything else I found.
  • Bob Shanks  - Removal of lenoleum from concrete floor
    :D :angry: I spent days trying to find the best way to remove the 17 year old lenoelum off of a kitchen concrete floor in our basement. SORRY folks there is no good way. BUT here is what I did.
    * Using a carpet knife, I scored 6" blocks over the entire floor.
    * removed the plastic cover from the cardboard backing. This leaves the cardboard backing and the glued down portion.
    * Soaked the floor with severial gallons of water and left it to adsorb for a few hours.
    * This portion took on a 200 sq ft floor a half day.
    * Finally, I went to the local tool rental house and rented a floor scraper, I was done in two hours and it only cost $50.00. Up to this point I had spent over $500.00 buying strippers, scrapers, saws, blades ETC none of which worked.
    There is no substute for elbo grease. SORRY
  • cassandra  - linoleum paper backing over concrete/adhesive help
    I'm going to be replacing our kitchen flooring with tile, the old linoleum that was there was shot so i didnt want to tile over it. i got the linoleum out without too much of a hassle, however it did take a lot of effort.

    however, now im left with the paper backing and the old glue on the floor. i got up around half of the paper backing id estimate but around half remains. its not very thick and in most spots its glued down very well.

    im going to be using ditra over the concrete (obviously thin-set between the two...) but my question is is it really necessary for me to remove the rest of the paper/adhesive? or can i just put the thin set over it and will it be okay?

    heres a pic

    http://s1112.photobucket.com/albums/k491/c0mpg1rl88/?action=view&curre nt=IMG_20120227_162901.jpg
  • Roger  - Tile
    Did you ever find out if it was necessary to remove the rest of the paper? I am doing a similar project and was wonder the same thing
  • Anonymous
    I dont know if you guys have made my life easier with all the good info OR totally discouraged me from taking on this laborious task.
  • Pat  - removing linoleum to tile???
    :love: I'm with you, work like a dog or forget it.
  • Tye  - Iron/wet towel
    We are using the wet towel and hot iron method here and it is working like a charm. It is slow going, but layers area coming up cleanly. I really didn't want to use chemicals or go rent equipment if I could avoid it, though I was prepared to do if necessary. It is totally unnecessary, this WORKS!
  • dee  - linoleum replacement
    I have to replace a piece of linoleum on my bathroom floor. there was a tear when I moved in which has become worse over time. there is old tile then plywood and the linoleum was on top of that.I only need to replace 2ftx2ft of it . got any ideas on how to do that?pastel yellow 1 inch squares
  • PHH  - Cement floor resurfacing
    I had carpet in basement, after several floods in basement, many pet accidents, got sick of mildew, stained carpet. So, I ripped up carpet, chiseled up linoleum tiles (2 - 3 layers!) Now I have to get the old mastic off so I can either paint or put new linoleum down.

    What is the best way to get very old mastic/adhesive off cement in basement?
  • grunt boy  - lino glue and paper on sub flooring
    I had success with a wood plane tool. I set the blade at a pretty aggressive level and had good success planing the paper off the floor. Not that hard to do. Just watch for nails so you don't chip the blade. There are wood rasps at hardware stores also but that would not likely work as the paper residue would plug the rasp. This technique levels the floor at the same time. And no chemicals.
  • Anonymous
    We have just bought a 50 yr old home with linoleum floors glued to the original wood planks. In order to properly assess some low spots in the floor we need to remove the linoleum and adhesive. Also we would like to just refinish the old wooden planks and not cover them with any additional floor covering. What is the best method to do this on a wood floor that you want to keep? Would the stripper method work better or the steamer method? There is a basement underneath the home and a very tiny crawl space between but it's too small to be of much use. Thanks.
  • Heidi  - What a GREAT forum!!
    A GREAT BIG thank you to all of you that have commented on this forum. You guys have been so helpful!!! I am excited to get back at it tomorrow and get rid of the linoleum!! :love:
  • Jim  - Stripped lineoleum glue from wood - 1920s home
    Hi folks. We had 3 layers of linoleum in our kitchen & breakfast nook. The original patterned flooring (burlap, linseed oil & clay), was glued onto the wood with a black adhesive. Above that was a layer of nailed Masonite onto which were glued the other layers.

    I used a circular saw to cut the vinyl-asbestos and Masonite into rectangles. The original flooring fractured as I used a scraper. After shop-vacuuming that stuff, I sampled a small section and found the adhesive to be water-soluble. So I spread newspapers over areas (4 ft.x 6 ft. or so), and kept them soaked. After aawhile, I experimented with scraping the goo. If it was still too green, I allowed that area to soak some more and worked in a different place. 100% of the glue came off the wood.
  • Paula  - Putting tile on top of linoleum??
    Does putting tile on linoleum work? Will it it adhear to the surface and is it sturdy? Great forum!
  • Chris N.  - Whata relief!
    It was wooden parquet glued over two layers of vinyl/linoleum flooring. The wood yielded to brute force, and was actually relatively easy, just work.
    But the flooring was insane. Layer number two was solvent masticed linoleum oved layer one (Armstong (vinyl?)). I had to chisel it up a square inch at a time. As I broke it up, the bottom layer delaminated. But I was lucky. Even though it took all day to pull up 175 of 187 sq ft, the bottom mastic was water soluable! My excitment. even my word choice, at completion might be described as orgasmic. 10 more square feet, and a vacuuming, and I can start to put the floating floor down.
  • Mark Mesaros
    how do i get vinyl flooring off a beautiful terrazo floor
  • Anonymous  - Install Armstrong Avantra 2 over linoleum on stair
    Purchased Armstrong Avantra 2 vinyl sheeting to recover a stairway leading from a kitchen to a basement.

    Moved here in 1982, am assuming what we have currently is probably true linoleum, possibly containing abestos.

    Was initially assuming we would have to remove the existing linoleum. Started on the first step/riser and finding it very very difficult to remove.

    Would it be a problem to just install over the old?

    Thanks Much
  • Adrian  - re: Best way to remove Linoleum Adhesive
    Mike Coons wrote:
    I needed to remove about 150 sq ft of linoleum last weekend. I tried the heat gun method and the floor steamer method and it took me about an hour and a half to remove about 15 sq ft. Use the following method and your life will be easier. Pull up the top layer of linoleum the best you can. This will leave just the paper backing and adhesive. Go to your local hardware store and buy a gallon of Klean Strip Adhesive Remover. I rolled it on with a cheap paint roller. Do not use a plastic paint pan because it will eat the paint pan. I poured it right on the floor and spread it around after it ate my paint pan. Wait about 15 minutes and use a long handled scraper and the paper and adhesive peels away with little effort. This left no damage at all to my particle board subfloor. If you are using a putty knife to peel it back make sure you are wearing gloves because the stripper will burn your skin. I took about an hour and a half to strip off about 135 Sq ft of ad...
  • Mary Beth
    Not sure if my first help request went. Bob the bad builder lived in my house. He lined all of my cabinets with glued on linoleum. I first attempted to scrape it off, that left a paper backing, when I removed that, there was some old yellow glue... gave up and lined the cabinets with that grid rubber liner. I now have to belly up to the problem. Iwant to paint the inside and out of all the cabinets and I want that gunk gone for good.. Have about 16 to do. Help please. P>S> the cabinets are from the 60s and I love them. Removal is not an option THANKS
  • Kris2013
    So we are pulling up 2 layers of linoleum and putting down ceramic tile do we really need to get all that paper off the wood sub floor or can we just go over that with the grout that we use to place tiles?
  • Cynthia
    Oh, boy, you all really have it easy. I'm removing real linoleum (not vinyl flooring) from original unfinished hardwood flooring in a 75-year-old house. In addition to the linoleum the floor had a layer of tile, a layer of masonite, another layer of tile, a layer of vinyl flooring, a layer of fiberboard underlayment, and a layer of wood parquet tiles. I'm down to the base layer of old, old linoleum and catching sight of the hardwood. This is a 14 x 20 foot kitchen and all of the cabinets are installed on top of the underlayment so have to be cut around (I'm not replacing cabinets or countertop so don't want to move them). Believe me, that old glue doesn't come up so easily. Besides this, a wall was removed at some point and those areas don't have hardwood so it will have to be patched. And some of the fill-in boards weren't thick enough so the extra space was filled in with roofing shingles and tarpaper! Ain't working in old houses fun!!??!!
  • Ablesn  - Wet towel and hot iron
    It works. It may take some time but it is so much easier.
    Once you have removed the plastic portion of the linoleum and
    left with the paper and adhesive score it with a box cutter, soak
    it with water IF you are removing it from concrete. Next wet a towel
    and get a cheap iron and set it on the highest setting. Place the wet
    towel where you want to start the removal (edge is best). Then place the
    iron on the towel for about 20 to 30 seconds remove the iron and towel and
    scrape with a putty knife or something with a thin edge. Hope this helps it helped
    me. Thanks to the previous post regarding this solution.
  • roger  - help!!
    i would like some help getting the glue off the ply wood floor it had two layes of linoleum would like to know if there is a easy way to get the glue off without all that scraping.i don`t have a heat gun, can you rent them.
  • Anonymous
    I removed our flooring from concrete. We did purchase the heat gun but it didn't work as well as the iron. I do believe you can rent a heat gun. Try H Depot some have a rental section.
  • Kirsty
    Just come across this while googling info about what we can do, so 2 yrs ago we bought our house, it has never been owner occupied and always rented so standards weren't ever very high. So on top of everything else that is dodgy, so are the floors. It was originally tiled, than they have layed wood floor lookalike lino over the tiles. I love this look but I hate lino!! I want to have tiles again. We were going to rip up the whole floor but after reading your posts above, im wondering what everyone thinks about retiling over the lino, bare in mind there are tiles under the lino aswell. We have no idea as to why they laid the lino, presuming its due to the tiles, they may possibly be in bad condition. As you can feel the tile joins whilst walking around I can feel that there are no obvious cracks or damage but we are concerned that pulling up the whole floor may be a very expensive process. So what do you think? Just retile over it again or not? Thanks for your advice :)
  • John  - What to do with real linoleum (not vinyl)
    If you have genuine linoleum (as opposed to vinyl, which is plastic) it may be stuck to the floor underneath with paper and tar, particularly if it was laid many years ago.

    If so, first tear up the linoleum from the paper; it should come away quite easily.

    Now comes the harder part: soak the paper in white spirit (US: mineral spirits) using a brush (or just pour it on) and scrape it away with a scraper – the broader and longer-handled the better. If the paper is very thick, you may need to soak and scrape more than once before it all comes away.

    You should now have exposed the floor, which will still have a lot of tar on it, probably in large blobs rather than evenly spread. Paint the whole surface, one part at a time, with plenty of white spirit (mineral spirits) using a wide brush, and then scrub the surface with a stainless steel pan-scourer (the bigger the better). The tar will gradually go up into solution in the solvent as you scrub, and can then be wiped away with kit...
  • John  - Real linoleum (continued)
    (continued from previous comment:)
    ...wiped away with kitchen towel tissue. If there’s a lot of tar, wipe it away when just some has come up, apply some more solvent, and repeat until all the tar has gone.

    You will need a lot of white spirit (mineral spirits): I needed 12 litres for an area of 4.5 square metres (3 gallons for 55 square feet). You will also need a catering-size pack of good quality kitchen towel tissue (I used 6 whole rolls for the above area) and a large bin liner or two to put your used tissue in.

    Finally, don’t smoke or use naked flames while doing this, and keep the area well ventilated. Also, don’t expect ever to wash out any tar which gets on your clothes!

    Incidentally, you could probably use kerosene (either paraffin or 28-second heating oil) instead of white spirit, as they are chemically very similar and may be cheaper. However, they may also smell a lot worse.
  • R. E. Payne  - Removing Linoleum from concrete
    Holy Mother of Bert & Ernie, trying to get Linoleum off of concrete is exhausting! Whoever invented the glue used on that stuff needs to be slapped sideways lol! I wish I would have known I could lay ceramic tiles over it, i would have done that! Is that Klean Steip Adheasive Remover a common product? I'm goin huntin for some tomorrow!
  • D. M. Marx  - Odor from adhesive
    I had new linoleum put in my kitchen and carpet in the livingroom in August of 2014. What I thought was the "new" linoleum and carpet continues to linger to today which is April 30, 2015. The installers removed the linoleum one week ago, and the smell is much worse. Numerous people are telling me it's the chemical reaction of the old glue and the new glue. How do I get rid of the smell that I've had in my house now for 9 months. No on can figure it out. The white paper backing is still on most of the floor. There are spots of old glue (black/brown/gold colore) where the paper was pulled up in the removal of the two layers of linoleum. This can't be healthly! Please help!
  • DOTTY PLEHN  - WALL BOARD PULLING WITH VINYL BASEBOARD,
    I REMOVED SOME VINYL BASEBOARDD,IN KITCHEN BUT SO OLD THAT THE WALL BOARD IS PULLING WITH THE BASE BOARD, WHAT CAN I USE TO SMOOTH OUT THE BUMPY NESS SO I CAN PUT NEW BASEBOARD ON,??/
  • Jane  - Linoleum removal/installation of new floor.
    I need some advise!!! I am installing engineer wood flooring into the kitchen, dinning room and foyer. The foyer had wood floors that i removed so the dinning room and foyer in down to the subfloor which is plywood. The kitchen however has Linoleum and some type of wood underlayment. How do you suggest that i either remove the linoleum OR level up the floor at the kitchen/dinning room entrance and the area that the foyer and eatin kitchen meet. Because there is like a 1/4 inch difference in height d/t the linoleum and underlayment.
    Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated. Easies and cost effect way. ... Can I leave the linoleum and put the wood floor over it and then put padding down in the foyer and dinning room? Would that be OK? Or should i put the padding throughout the new install?
  • Vicki Hansen  - 1930's linoleum over hardwood
    4 of us will try and remove old linoleum from our cabin - have heat gun will travel. going to put concrete and wood floor coating /paint on after. If anything it should be laughs. Right? Anything will be better than that buckled up old linoleum that has been duct taped down at each door way, It had it's glory. We say Good Bye linoleum hello painted wood floors.
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